written by
Dan Leon & Anton Myskiw

Research shows a significant pipeline of industrial demand, can we THINK™ like supply chain managers to predict where it will go?

 

Our team hopes everybody is staying safe and healthy during these unprecedented times. 5 months ago, California and our office went into a state of lockdown. Businesses temporarily shut their doors, some fully closing in consequence. The state of the economy and real estate sector shifted overnight. The industry collectively held their breath in anticipation of what was to come.

Friday, March 18th, we were both new to the functionality of working-from-home. We sat on a Zoom call that morning discussing the market implications, whether it was derived from Peter Linneman’s Webinar or general market sentiment. The bottom-line from our discussion was that our firm needed to take a proactive approach to recent events and that a refresh in our investment strategy was necessary. Through significant macro & microeconomic research over the course of the next two weeks, we arrived at a high-level strategic concept of pursuing logistics-based industrial assets. Once we had a foundation, we needed to piece together support around this idea.

Two primary drivers reinforced our reflections: the rebirth of domestic production (offshoring to onshoring manufacturing) and the surge of e-commerce.

Over the past 2 years, retail e-commerce sales, as a percentage of total retail sales, have increased by 500 bps. The volume of those purchasing staple and discretionary items at the touch of a button has only increased from the onset of the virus, with many market experts believing in an irreversible shift from traditional brick-and-mortar sale. The previous, intertwined with the growing argument for domestic manufacturing, invokes the need for logistics-based assets in the near future. The fact that the opportunity cost margin of offshoring production of final goods is shrinking, due to on-going trade discussions/uncertainty & increasing labor costs overseas, supports the prior. Our vision encapsulates these market shifts, in our pursuit of suburban distribution centers (best utilized for same-day delivery), city-center distribution centers (1-2-day delivery), and manufacturing facilities.

As a result of this accelerated e-commerce adoption, the increased inventory levels required by retailers could generate square footage demand for logistics-based industrial equivalent to the total supply of industrial assets in the Inland Empire. Now that we have our rationale behind the investment, where does the demand go, and how do we intend to capture it? That’s where the proprietary THINK™  process came into play. Our team developed a quantitative site selection formula that incorporates the use of multivariable regression analysis to find markets that are best positioned to serve future logistics operations.

In effect, we had to understand what drives the logistics industry, where supply chains would thrive, and ultimately, we had to THINK™ like a supply chain manager.

If you have any interest in learning more about the acquisition & financial criterion within our 3rd offering, please reach out to the experts at Intersection.

written by
Emily Bane

Intersection Completes 1031 Exchange for Long-Term NNN Lease

Intersection represented South Lind Square, LLC in the 1031 exchange which resulted in the purchase of the Safeway at La Toscana Village in Tucson, Arizona for $10,750,000. Intersection Managing Director Mark Hoekstra and Senior Director Rob Kerr represented the buyer, Greg Cortese of The Royston Group represented the seller. 

The 46,798 square-foot retail property is located at 7110 N. Oracle Road, Tucson, AZ 85704. The retail center is situated in a densely populated, affluent and developing area of Tucson. The Safeway building is one of 14 that comprise La Toscana Village, which is anchored by national retail tenants, and located at a heavily trafficked intersection at N. Oracle Road and W. Ina Road. 

Originally built in 1992 and renovated in 2014, 7110 N. Oracle Road is 100% occupied by Safeway in a 20-year NNN lease with options and regular base rent increases.

The property was part of the buyer’s upleg for their 1031 exchange, acquired at a 5.2% cap rate. The lease was corporately guaranteed by Albertsons Companies. Financing for the transaction was provided by 40/86 Mortgage Capital with the assistance of Charlie Robinson of NorthMarq.

Intersection was approached by the buyer to identify 1031 exchange opportunities that would provide both a high-quality and safe investment for the family that met their long-term goals, requirements, and criteria. 

“The process involved the thorough evaluation of numerous properties of all types across a diverse range of desired geographic locations nationwide,” said Kerr. “In the end we were able to identify a number of great options that met requirements, and the client settled on this excellent Safeway investment in Tucson.”

Emily Bane is the Marketing Coordinator at Intersection, providing strategic marketing expertise to support business objectives across company divisions. Contact Emily at 619-819-8725 or ebane@intersectioncre.com

written by
Emily Bane

Intersection Completes 1031 Exchange to Reduce Clients Stress and Increase Cash Flow

Intersection commercial real estate represented Elizabeth H. Riggs Trust in the 1031 exchange which resulted in the purchase of Barons Market for $4,650,000 at the Menifee Lakes Plaza in Menifee, Calif. Intersection Senior Director, Kyle Clark, represented the buyer, CBRE’s Newport Beach office represented the seller Menifee Lakes Plaza, LLC.

The 17,854 square-foot retail space is located at 29787 Antelope Road, Menifee, CA 92584. The building is one of 13 that comprise the new, 138,000 square-foot Menifee Lakes Plaza, located at the intersection of Newport Road and Interstate 215.

The property served to complete the 1031 exchange for the buyer, who was selling their apartment building for a less management-intensive asset to provide stable cash flow and preserve her monthly income in the years to follow. 

Clark was approached by the buyer’s son to identify a single-tenant property under a long term NNN lease while avoiding high risk tenant types such as restaurant chains or traditional retailers. After searching nationwide for suitable properties, tying up two other prospects that failed during the due diligence review, Clark identified the Barons Market property.

“It was close to home, yet provided an attractive cap rate and return similar to other out of state alternatives,” said Clark. “Since closing on the low maintenance property, our client is thrilled with her increased cash flow without all the management headaches.”

Emily Bane is the Marketing Coordinator at Intersection, providing strategic marketing expertise to support business objectives across company divisions. Contact Emily at 619-819-8725 or ebane@intersectioncre.com

written by
Dan Leon

The Second Acquisition in a Portfolio Delivering Strong Cash Flow for Investors

CARLSBAD, Calif. – San Diego based commercial real estate management and investment advisory firm Intersection announced the closing of escrow on La Place Court in Carlsbad on Feb. 12, 2020.  The office property is the second procured by the company for the Intersection Diversified Value Fund (IDVF), which provides investors with a portfolio of properties that have in-place cash flow and high potential for appreciation.

La Place Court offers 81,965 square feet of office space on a 4.58-acre campus with two office buildings.  Historically, the property has maintained a high occupancy, and as of closing, 90% of the property is leased.

Intersection acquired La Place Court from Swift Real Estate Partners, represented by Louay Alsadek, for approximately $15.8 million.  Financing was completed by CBRE Capital Markets team Bill Chiles and Scott Peterson.

La Place Court is the second property in the IDVF, which is targeted to acquire $60 million in properties with approximately $25 million in equity according to Intersection Director of Acquisitions Dan Leon.  The fund’s other property is Oberlin Court in Sorrento Mesa, which was acquired in May 2019.

“We feel that the risk adjusted returns for this product type are solid, especially given the continued strength of the Carlsbad submarket as indicated by increasing tenant demand from the technology sector, improving workforce talent, and strong demographics,” Leon said.

With this acquisition, Intersection officially plants their flag in Carlsbad, with plans to be a tenant of La Place Court providing on site brokerage and management services.

“Having ownership on site enhances the value of the property for investors,” said Intersection Senior Director Henry Zahner, who represented Intersection in the sale.

“By having a presence at La Place Court, we’ll be in a unique position to familiarize ourselves with both the property and its tenants,” said Zahner.  “Furthermore, we will gain valuable insights in leasing remaining space.”

Leon added, “Being on site is all about the delivery of best-in-class service.  It means being there for our tenants.” 

Quality of service is a hallmark for Intersection, which is led by Rocco Cortese and Mark Hoekstra.  With more than 60 years of experience in the real estate industry, Cortese and Hoekstra have built a customer-focused team that is providing investment, brokerage, and management Concierge services in the commercial real estate industry.

With this focus in mind, Intersection plans to modernize the property by integrating a seamless connectivity between indoor and outdoor working environments.  Leon says this will create an innovative atmosphere at La Place Court, attracting a cohesive tenant mix that lays the groundwork for collaborative opportunities among tenants.

La Place Court promises to be a truly unique work setting that already offers tenants convenience and high-end amenities.  Located in the prestigious Carlsbad Research Center, the facility boasts exceptional access to Interstate 5 and Highway 78.  With the McClellan-Palomar Airport less than one mile away and being centrally located between San Diego and Orange County, the property provides an ideal hub for doing business in Southern California.

“By acquiring a high-end asset at below replacement cost, we’re providing investors with a portfolio that enhances short and long-term appreciation,” Leon said.

Opportunities to invest with Intersection will remain through 2020 as the team continues to secure properties and raise capital for the IDVF. Inquiries about the fund or investing can be sent via email to investors@intersectioncre.com.

Dan Leon is the Director of Acquisitions, managing the performance of the funds and investments sponsored by Intersection. Contact Dan at 619-541-6070 or dleon@intersectioncre.com

written by
Rob Kerr
Sale-Leaseback Overview

In commercial real estate sale-leaseback transactions, a property owner sells real estate used in their business to an unrelated private/institutional investor or other third party.  At the time of the sale, the property is leased back to the seller for a mutually agreed upon time period. It is generally structured as a 10 to 30-year triple net lease and often includes renewal options.  If executed successfully, a sale-leaseback will be mutually beneficial to both the seller/lessee and buyer/lessor.  All parties must give careful consideration to the business, tax advantages and disadvantages associated with this type of arrangement.

 
Seller Advantages
  • Improves bottom line —company can focus on their core operational business resulting in potential increased returns, productivity and efficiencies.
  • Seller receives 100% of property value (subject to possible capital gains tax) versus conventional financing or re-financing options with likely more favorable terms and without the associated fees and possible covenants.
  • Reallocation of capital/reinvestment of sale proceeds.
    • Funds available for dividends, re-purchase of stock, debt payments or financing of mergers and acquisitions.
    • Conversion of non-earning assets into investment capital provides flexibility and often results in potential higher return on capital/profitability.
  • Improves balance sheet and credit standing – eliminates asset book value and liability and replaces with cash resulting in improved financial ratios.
  • Position the company to take advantage of beneficial tax treatments.
    • Lease payments versus depreciation/interest deductions which may have inherent limitations, especially over time.
    • Timing of gain and loss recognition including the ability to offset expiring net operating losses.
  • Typically, a higher sales price is achieved in this type of transaction unlocking the property’s appreciated value while owner/user maintains occupancy.
  • Can act as a deterrent to corporate takeovers.
 
Seller Disadvantages
  • Loss of residual property value.
  • Possible relocation at the end of the lease term.
  • Potential for some loss of flexibility.
  • High rental payments if market softens.
 
Final Thoughts

Sale-leaseback may be an excellent way for a company to continue uninterrupted use of the property while retaining certain control over the real estate that is important to its operations for the foreseeable future. It also enables the company to free up debt and equity capital to achieve some of the various advantages listed above. Generally, the possible seller advantages outweigh the potential disadvantages. While there are certain marketing and legal restraints, with the right advisers the transaction can be carried out, the value is maximized, and the company’s operational interest are adequately protected during the term of the lease.

Rob Kerr is a Senior Director at Intersection, offering expertise in both property acquisition and disposition as well as investment sales, including NNN, retail, industrial, and multi-family. Contact Rob at 619-369-2400 or rkerr@intersectioncre.com

written by
Rocco Cortese

There is a mystical element to the concept of a Family Office. Seen, but not heard. Looked for, but not found.  In the past few years the Family Office has become a commonly used term when it comes to raising capital. Someone you know has relationships, is targeting, or working with a large Family Office, or a group of them. When I first heard the term, I thought to myself “This is a group of investors we have to get connected with. We built our company by delivering informed strategy and highly personalized service to private investors and owners of commercial real estate. They are the ideal client profile!” So, we embarked upon a journey to build a set of relationships with high quality, high net worth family offices who were looking to get more out of commercial real estate. We soon realized that it wasn’t going to be easy.

We started our research where any astute business person would; we googled it, “Family Office Investing” and up came the results. Pages and pages of lists, referral sources, strategies and conferences that would give us access to the names, locations and in some cases investment strategies for all shapes and sizes of family offices.  We didn’t feel like buying a list of names for $4,000 was the best value proposition so we attended conferences where we might connect with a few of them (there are many to choose from). I can tell you from personal experience, few if any of these family offices or their representatives want to be solicited at a conference. Unless you have a direct referral into them, or a preexisting relationship, connecting was not easy. Soliciting really isn’t our style anyway, so we were left in a bit of a lurch as to next steps.

With little success in making connections to new family office relationships, we paused and took a long look at our own company. We needed to get a better idea of who we were and whether or not we were a fitting partner for family offices. We were just getting started with a branding project and part of that project was to interview our current clients in order to better understand their expectations of us. The process resulted in a new name, look and set of internal values that really spoke to who we were.

A significant part of the branding project was research. We interviewed internal stakeholders and fifteen clients across all categories of the service platform. These interviews gave us incredibly valuable insight as to what our clients liked and disliked about the various services we provided for them. It was then that we realized we were going about the idea of building our client base with family offices the wrong way. We knew we could do good work for them, and we knew we wanted to grow relationships with like-minded investors.  However, we didn’t understand that the value our company offered them wasn’t as important to them as our values. By clarifying our values, we took the first and most important step in building a platform that would put us in a position to broaden the set of investors for whom we worked. Today, many of them are family offices and the way we have done it has been an enlightening and fun journey.

There are many kinds of family offices and they need trusted partners with whom they can invest. We recognized this because when we analyzed our current list of clients, we found that a couple of them had portfolios with significant value. They trusted us to manage and lease multiple properties worth millions! They were our best clients and they were actually running a micro-family office.

A micro family office is characterized by the volume under management being much smaller than the normal minimum threshold to set up a family office. We were working for two micro-family offices but just didn’t think about them that way. In fact, and this is often the case with micro family offices, they did not view themselves to be in this category of family offices at all. We had built deep relationships with these clients over the years and had a successful track record of performance for them. Understanding their bigger picture objectives-legacy, transference of wealth, charity, and many other dynamics of their family office helped us put together a road map for future family office clients.

Single family and multi-family offices generally operate on a much higher scale than the micro-family office. Here is the distinction:  The single-family office only serves one single family and does not accept external management mandates. The multi-family office services more than one family and may offer a more generic solution to their clients. In fact, many of the family offices that would seek out a multi-family office partner to support them are so large that they operate much like an institution.

Remember a little earlier when I mentioned values?  An integral aspect of our branding project was establishing core values. In our company, they are Wisdom, Equality, Determination, Ingenuity, Stewardship and Collaboration. These values speak to the internal qualities that govern our conduct, and external qualities that support our clients. With that clarity, our entire organization has circled around a path that is destined to enhance the lives of those we serve. Our brand promise, “vision and guidance to help you get more out of commercial real estate”, similarly supplied us with critical direction. By defining who we were internally and how we had helped our clients over the years, we developed the correct ethos with which to engage this mystical entity called the family office.

The reality that we were already working with micro family offices helped us be more intuitive as we serviced them. Some still don’t think of themselves in the micro family office category, but they are. Our relationship with our micro-family offices blossomed with the start of our first fund. It gave us the opportunity to put our own money into investments alongside of them and elevate the trust they have in us. Fortunately, they told a few friends about what we were doing, and we built relationships with a few new families.

Today, we have grown into the proud manager of commercial real estate for six family offices that vary in size. The smallest of those is a $30M family and the largest is a family worth hundreds of millions. We learned that the key to building those relationships was creating a matching set of values, and a service profile that matched as well. That took us to new product offerings and to new relationships that allow us to do what we do best. The mystical element didn’t really exist at all…we were already doing work for them and just needed to define the alignment that had made us successful partners over the years.

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